Lesson Plan Portfolio

Artist Presentation Extension:

Kendall Ague

Grade Level: 1st grade

 Big Idea/Theme:

“Almost everyone can remember in grade school art class placing paper over the face of a coin or some other textured object and rubbing it with crayon.  I employed this same method to create [my] portraits.” -Kumi Yamashita

  • Introducing to the students the idea of “relief” in art.
  • The season of fall and the changing of the leaves colors and shapes
  • Integrating art into a lesson of money; first have the students count money, play with money, and do experiments with money
  • After the children explore the value of money, the introduction of how coins can provide for a great and cool print making technique will be shown to the students.

*For a challenge, have your students add up how much their money tree is worth, or see how many of the state quarters they can identify if they used any quarters to create a texture relief.

 

Lesson Rationale (Description of what the lesson is about and why it is important for students to learn):

Learning about money is valuable, especially in elementary school.  Learning about different art techniques is valuable as well, and provides students with new ways to create things in the future.  It is important that students learn to techniques and strategies in creating art because they can carry those new ideas with them when they are creating anything, whether it be art related or not.  Using art integration when talking about money is important too because it provides students with the ability to not see money as a math subject, but just as a learning experience in general.

 Objectives

Students will (What will students learn? What specific knowledge, skills and/or attitudes will they gain):

  • Students will learn about coins and their different values as well as what each coin looks like
  • Students will learn about Kumi Yamashita and how she would use textures and 3-Dimmensional objects to create relief art pieces
  • Students will learn about relief and how coins can be used to represent leaves on their “Coin trees”
  • Students will learn about fall and the different color leaves that come with the season

 List at least one Georgia Performance Standard that you are addressing (www.georgiastandards.org)

Historical Understandings
SS1H1: The student will read about and describe the life of historical figures in American history. (those that are on the faces of the penny, nickel, dime and quarter.

 

Essential Questions/talking points (How will you facilitate students thinking and talking about the lesson theme or subject):

Ask students if they know how much a penny is worth, and ask them if they know who is on the penny?  Go on asking them that question for the nickel, dime, and quarter as well.  Then ask them if they have ever used coins to buy something, if so, what did they buy?

Then ask the students if they have ever made art work with coins or done anything with coins other than use them to pay for something?

Exemplar Artist(s):

Kumi Yamashita

Performance Tasks (What activities will students engage in? What artifacts will they create?):

 Students will engage in the activities of learning the value of coins and learning how to use them.  They will also learn the differences between the various coins like who is on each one of them, their colors, shapes, and sizes.  They will then create a “Coin Tree” where the coins are used as relief to represent the leaves on the tree.  The students will be encouraged to create different colored fall leaves out of the different coins. 

Materials: (List everything students and teachers will need including teacher resources)

  • Coins (if you have any foreign coins, this makes it even more fun!)
  • Fall colored crayons: red, green, orange, yellow, brown
  • Brown and black construction paper so that the students can first draw the base of their tree (its trunk and branches) that they will later use to fill with their “coin leaves”
  • pencils
  • scissors
  • Glue
  • white construction paper

 Class Plan (sequence of instruction)

Intro:

“Hello class! Today we are going to be learning about the different kinds of coins that we use each day and how they could be helpful to us in making a drawing of a tree! I know you all may be thinking, how in the world can I create a drawing of a tree with coins, right?!  Well today you will learn how the use of “relief” in art can make something very cool.

 Lesson activities:

  1. On any brown or black colored paper, make an outline of a tree trunk by tracing around your fingers and forearm.  Another option could be to draw your own tree or provide the students with a print out of a tree trunk and branches.
  2. Crumple up the paper to give the tree trunk and branches a more textured look.
  3. Gently un-crumple the paper up after it forms a ball in your hand.
  4. Cut out the tree trunk and branches from the paper.
  5. Glue the tree trunk onto background white construction paper so that the different color leaves will be able to be seen.
  6. Gather various sized coins
  7. Place each coin individually under the white construction paper and trace over it with various different fall colored crayons
  8. allow the students to trace as many coins as they’d like, as long as the student can still make out which coin they used to trace so that they know it’s value
  9. Encourage the students to use all of the colors of crayons to trace the coins so that their tree looks like a tree during the season of fall

 

Closure:

Students will be able to share with their classmates what their tree creation looked like and even describe a place where they would want to plant this tree if they had the option to.

If possible and if there is enough time, have the students try to count how many of each coin they used.  Then from there try to have the students add up the values of all the coins they used on their tree.

Clean-up:

Students will be asked to throw away all scrap pieces of paper, make sure the top on their glue is on tight, and to put away all crayons and markers they used in the place that they got them from.

 Assessment/Evaluation:

Students can be evaluated on the following:

  1. Did they grasp the concept of the values of each coin?
  2. Did they use each of the different coins in their “Coin Tree”?
  3. Did they use each of the different colored coins to make coin relief leaves for their “Coin Tree”?
  4. Did they use the coins in creative ways, not using just one of the same coins over and over again to make the relief?
  5. Were the students able to add up the total value of all their coins on their tree?

 Classroom: (How is your classroom functioning as a teacher? How are you helping your classroom to be visually rich?)

My classroom would be functioning as a teacher by encouraging the students to let me hang their “Coin Trees” on the Fall-themed bulletin board in my room.  This would provide pleasing colors and the chance for students to show off their work and view other’s work.

____________________________________________________

Chase Street Practicum Lesson #1:

Kendall Ague

Project title:    Monster Mania                     Target grade level:   1st grade 

Project Theme or Big Idea:

  1. Halloween
  2. 2-Dimensional and 3-Dimensional
  3. Stepping into a different character role and using your imagination

Objectives (What do you hope the students will gain or explore):

The students will practice their creativity by creating monsters from their imagination.  The students will design a 2-Dimensional monster and transform it into a 3-Dimensional monster using Model Magic.  Students will explore their school with a new perspective, thinking of corners and places where a monster could hide.  The students will then transform their ideas of places a monster could hide into a spot to hide the monster they create.  We hope students will gain a desire to be creative and going past what a traditional monster may look like.  We also hope they will work on following instructions in the midst of all of the different activities and directions.

Student Materials (list of supplies students will need to complete the project, list EVERYTHING):

  • Model Magic
  • Paper (traditional drawing paper or printer paper)
  • Bucket of markers
  • Feathers
  • Pipe cleaners

Teacher Materials (What will you need in addition to student materials in order to teach the lesson eg. Samples, images, templates):

  • iPhone- this will be needed to take photos of where each student hid their finished product monster
  • The monsters we made previously- we will show them our monsters and also model how we used the model magic

Intro (how will you begin the experience; what questions will you ask to guide the lesson? What if any resources will you show):

To begin our experience we will introduce ourselves and tell them that we have a very fun lesson planned for them today!  We will explain to the kids that “once they walked in the room they entered into a world that was invaded by monsters– not scary monsters, of course, just interesting and different looking creatures who were looking for a place to stay! They decided Chase Street Elementary was the perfect home for themselves.”

Procedures (how will you guide the experience? What activities will students engage in? How will you teach technical skills as well as lesson themes? How much time will each activity take?):

The first procedure we would complete would be to split the kids into groups of 3-5 depending on how many kids are present that day.

SAY: “Come close everyone, we have a secret to tell you! (in whisper voice)  You may not know this but you have just entered into a world of monsters!  Not scary monsters, of course, just interesting and different looking creatures who were looking for a place to stay! They decided Chase Street Elementary was the perfect home for themselves. Only a select few of special students get to experience what a world is like with monsters, and you all are the lucky ones!  Since you’ve entered monster world, you are no longer a little boy or girl, you are a monster.  We want you all to close your eyes and imagine what you would look like.”

SAY: “Alright now that you all have had a little time to imagine what kind of monster you’d look like, do you think you can draw what you imagined?

DO: Draw the monster you imagined you would look like. (provide paper and makers) (5 minutes)

DO: Now we are going to make, out of model magic these monsters and other monsters! (doesn’t have to be the same as what they drew it can be different) *Show examples* (20 minutes)

*Have students turn to a friend and tell where they would hide in their house to scare their family? In your pantry? Under your bed? Behind the couch? Maybe even in a tree? (2 minutes)

Clean up!

Whichever table cleans up the table fastest and the best gets to go around the hallway and certain school areas to hide their monsters first. (5 minutes)

Now we are going to take our monsters and hide them around the school so they can pop out and scare people!! ** you can leave them where you hid them (at the risk of them being gone) or you can take them home with you to bring a little bit of monster world back into your own home!

*Walk around the school in small groups hiding monsters and take pictures of where they hid them. We will print out these pictures to give to them the next time we visit and so that the children will be able to present to the class where they each hid their own monster. (15 minutes)

Closure (how will you bring the experience to an end):

Once we are done the kids will sit in a circle and the teachers will show all the kids pictures (taken via teacher’s iPhone) of where they chose to hide their monsters. (5 minutes)

Evaluation (how will you measure your success and identify changes that need to be made for next time):

  1. Did they make use of the materials provided?
  2. How was their ability to follow directions and stay on task during clean up?
  3. Did they work well together?
  4. Did they communicate with one another on where they would hide in their own homes if they were actually a monster?
  5. Did they enjoy hiding the monsters and think of creative spots to hide them?

Clean-up (How will you facilitate clean-up with the students?):

Students will clean up before they get to walk around and hide their monsters. They are to clean up their area and we will tell them whoever’s group cleans up the fastest (but still cleans to the best of their ability) gets to go hide their monster first.   

Post-lesson Reflection (How did it go?)

The lesson went great.  The students were extremely excited about the idea that they had entered into an unrealistic, imaginary monster world.  Many of the students did not create the same monster that they drew but instead improved or expanded on the idea they drew on the paper.  All of the students were excited to hide their monsters, and the incentive to clean up paid off because almost all of the students followed clean-up instructions perfectly.  At times it was difficult to supervise all of the students when they were hiding their monsters around the school in places in close proximity to the classroom.  However, all of the students knew that they were not to leave a specific hallway or wing of the school and followed directions well.

____________________________________________________

Chase Street Practicum Lesson #2:

Kendall Ague

Project title:    “Falling” Into Thanksgiving    

Target grade level:   1st grade 

Project Theme or Big Idea:

  1. History
  2. Holiday
  3. Seasons
  4. Thanksgiving
  5. Thankfulness and being thankful for what you have

Objectives (What do you hope the students will gain or explore):

  • Students will use their imagination and creativity to create their own turkey.
  • Students will explore painting with their fingers as well as gain a deeper understanding about the history of America and the history of Thanksgiving
  • Students will reflect on what they are thankful for.

Student Materials (list of supplies students will need to complete the project, list EVERYTHING):

  • red paint, brown paint, yellow paint, and black paint
  • cups (for the paint)
  • orange, red, and black markers
  • Thanksgiving book
  • leaves (can either be collected before hand by the teacher for each student or if time permits collected by the students themselves)
  • crayons
  • white drawing paper or printer paper
  • glue sticks
  • paper towels

Teacher Materials (What will you need in addition to student materials in order to teach the lesson eg. Samples, images, templates):

  • Thanksgiving book- “Squanto’s Great Thanksgiving”

Intro (how will you begin the experience; what questions will you ask to guide the lesson? What if any resources will you show): 

We will reintroduce ourselves and ask them if they know what holiday is coming up. To prompt the discussion of the First Thanksgiving, we will also know if any of the students know any historical details about the holiday coming up. 

We will then ask them to gather in a circle on the rug on the front of the room and tell them we will be reading them a story about the very first thanksgiving ever, one that includes Indians and Pilgrims!

Procedures (how will you guide the experience? What activities will students engage in? How will you teach technical skills as well as lesson themes? How much time will each activity take?):

  • Reading: (15 minutes)

First, we will have the students gather on the rug in the front of the room and we will read them a story about pilgrims and indians.

  • Discussion: (10 minutes)

Say, “We read in the book that the mighty indian warriors appeared from the forest carrying deer, wild turkeys, and vegetables. It was a great feast!” Does anyone here eat turkey on thanksgiving day? Did anyone know why we eat Turkey on thanksgiving day? Does anyone eat anything other than turkey on thanksgiving day? Turkey is also an american bird. When Abraham Lincoln decided to make Thanksgiving a holiday in 1863 it became the official food to eat.

  • Instructions and Setting Up Materials: (5 minutes)

Have the kids make their own turkeys! We will lay out on their table cups of red, yellow, and orange paint. Explain to the students that they will use paper and scissors to create a body, then using their fingerprints (but only either your pointer finger or thumb!) they will make the turkey’s feathers. They will also use the markers to draw legs, beaks, and gizzards. Kids will have the freedom to make the turkey look however they imagine it to look!

  • Discussion: (5 minutes)

Say, “We also read in this book how the pilgrims were thankful for their new home, Squanto, their land, and the chance to live in a free country… so they had a thankfulness feast!!  Have you ever thought about thanksgiving being a day of thankfulness? Don’t forget to give thanks this Thanksgiving! Can everyone write on your paper something you are thankful for? (We will share at the end with the whole class what we are thankful for.)

  • Creating the turkeys: (15 minutes)

Make the turkeys and finish them by adding what you are thankful for at the bottom of your page!

  • Optional Leaves Creation: (10 minutes)

We will bring in leaves, and demonstrate that when you put a leaf under a piece of paper and color over it with a crayon, it comes through the paper.  Students will choose which leaves they want to trace and will use the crayons to trace the leaves. Students will have the opportunity to create / draw trees or forest using their leaves. They will be encouraged to think about the different colors of fall and to use those colors.

Closure (how will you bring the experience to an end): 

Students will clean up, then come back to the circle to share what they are thankful for.

Evaluation (how will you measure your success and identify changes that need to be made for next time):

  1. Did they follow directions?
  2. Did they use their imagination to create their own unique and individual turkey?
  3. Were they able participate in discussion and share think about what they are truly thankful for?
  4. If time permitted, did they use the tracing leaves activity to create something fun, different, and creative?

Clean-up (How will you facilitate clean-up with the students?):

Students will be asked to clean up the table they were working at, we will encourage the tables to look exactly like they did before they created their turkeys.  The students that followed directions and cleaned up to the best of their ability will have the first opportunities to share what their turkeys looked like, their turkey’s names, and what they are thankful for.

Post-lesson Reflection (How did it go?)

The lesson went great.  The students enjoyed discussing Thanksgiving at the beginning of the lesson because each student got an opportunity to share their own family’s traditions on Thanksgiving.  All of the students enjoyed the book we read to them and enjoyed being able to use paints in a very hands on way.  However, we should have provided smocks for the children because the activity got messier than we intended it to and some children left with paint on their clothing (thank goodness for washable paints, right?!)  Also, no students had time for the leaf activity but that is one that we will use another time.

 

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